Tag Archives: Iams Home 4 the Holidays

A Shelter Drive-By

11-16-12IH4TH logoThis time of year, my company is deep into Iams Home 4 the Holidays. This is the 14th year that we’ve partnered with Mike Arms and the Helen Woodward Animal Center to help get orphaned pets adopted and into furever homes–our goal this year is 1.2 million pets!

So right now a big focus of my work life is looking for ways to help get more orphaned pets adopted. And that makes me look for ways I can help in my personal life. And I’m really excited about an idea from Dr. V of Pawcurious: A shelter drive-by.

What’s a shelter drive-by?

11-16-12papertowelIt’s so simple! I had to go to my local warehouse store today. Before I left, I took a look at the wish list on the Greater Dayton Humane Society’s web site. Among the listed items was paper towels and paper bowls–perfect items to purchase from a warehouse store! Which is exactly what I did–along with all the rest of the things on my list. And on the way home, I dropped the paper towels and paper bowls off at the shelter. So incredibly easy! What a difference we could make by doing a simple shelter drive-by once or twice a month!

Take action!

So here’s my challenge to you: Next week, Thanksgiving begins the madness that is the holidays. Start a new tradition for the holidays that you can carry into the new year. Establish the habit of looking at the wish list of your favorite shelter or rescue. And once a month, do a shelter drive-by when you do your grocery shopping. If your finances are in good shape, do it twice a month. If we all do it, our shelters can take the money they would have used for supplies and use it for more worthy things–like saving more animals! Wouldn’t that be a wonderful thing?

~*~

A Kitten Shower

It's a Kitten Shower!

It’s a Kitten Shower!

We had a kitten shower at the office on Friday. But wait! There’s more…

Little Boy Kitty

Little Boy Kitty

Every September, we (the employees of Iams) take a day away from the office and do rehab work on a shelter in our area–as part of our celebration of Iams Home 4 the Holidays. This year, we worked on the Humane Society of Greater Dayton.

New Mom Robin and Lazer Tag for Kitties!

New Mom Robin and Lazer Tag for Kitties!

A couple of weeks before our scheduled day of work, somebody dumped a trio of kittens at the shelter. Yes, I said dumped–and the kittens were only a couple of days old.

Little Girl Kitty

Little Girl Kitty

As it happened, some of our folks were there doing prep work for the rehab. My buddy Robin was outlining some of the murals that would be painted later by the larger group. Robin was outraged that kittens so young would be separated from their mom.

Little Gray Boy During the Shelter Rehab

Little Gray Boy During the Shelter Rehab

Over the following weeks, Robin stopped by ever few days to visit and care for the three little kittens. She was charmed and moved by their resilience and their will to survive.

Last week, at six weeks old, the shelter director decided they were old enough for Robin to foster. So Robin took them home. And started her journey down the short path of failing “Foster 101.”

Newly named Jezabelle, Jaxon, and Jasper.

Newly named Jezabelle, Jaxon, and Jasper.

So on Friday we had a kitten shower. Someone sent her a meeting notice for a bogus meeting and we yelled “Surprise!” when she joined us. And there were balloons and presents. And much laughter. And lots of phone photos of really cute little fuzz balls.

Robin told us that the family was having a hard time naming the kittens–and that her husband was OK with adopting two, but not sure about adopting three. I figured, if we could name all three then hubby would have a harder time saying no. So we asked the Iams community on Facebook. Robin took their suggestions, and the kittens are now Jezabelle, Jaxon, and Jasper.

C’mon hubby! Three kitties are just as easy to take care of as two kitties. And an extra excuse for warm snuggles!

~

A Man and His Dog

I’m in New York City today so that I can attend the Bideawee Gala tonight!

We (Iams) will receive the “Bideawee Corporate Award” in recognition of our corporate contributions to foster the health and well being of pets (The Bideawee Gala and  A Short History of Bideawee).

6-13-11 1Also receiving an award this evening is Mr. Joseph Garrison. Joe has had a huge involvement as a member of Bideawee’s Board of Directors. But the thing I like most about him is devotion to his dog. Joe adopted Austin – his gentle and beloved Wheaten Terrier – from Bideawee. They have been inseparable since! Joe and Austin were regular participants at Bideawee’s management and Board meetings, fundraising events and community outreach activities. He is being honored for his exceptional leadership and unwavering commitment to Bideawee’s values and mission of promoting and supporting safe, loving, long-term relationships between people and companion animals.

6-13-11 2Joe was first elected to the Bideawee Board of Directors in December 1994 and served as Officer of the Board in the positions of Vice Chair (2004-2007), Secretary (2008) and Treasurer (2007 and 2009). As a Board Officer, Joe served regularly in the Executive Management Committee (2004-2008). He also served and chaired several standing Board Committees, including Nominating (2005, 2006 and 2008), Finance (1998, 2003, 2006, Chair 2007 and 2009), Compensation (2007, 2009), Audit (Chair, 2008). Last but not least, Joe also served in ad hoc Board committees including the Oversight Committee (1996-2001) and the Senior Advisory Committee (2009). Joe retired from active Board membership at the end of 2009 and joined our Board Emeritus group in January 2010.

A very active 16-year tenure on the Board of Directors, and he continues to serve in the Board Emeritus group. Now that’s devotion to a cause!

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Photos From My 2010 Visit to Bideawee

I’ve been writing the past couple of days about Bideawee in New York City, and I thought I should mention that I got to visit Bideawee last year. While I was there I learned that on average, pets stay with the Center around 32 days before being adopted by their forever family. They usually have around 100 animals available, with more cats than dogs (25-30 dogs/70-75 cats). Bideawee does its best to set the pet up for successful adoption—and they succeed! The national average for pet returns is 15-20%. Bidawee’s returns is only 5%! People come from all over the country to find their match at Bideawee. And the pets come from all over too! While I was there, I got to meet some Chihuahuas from California (where there has been an outbreak of “purse” dogs) and some puppies from Tennessee.

Unlike other adoption centers I’ve visited, Bideawee Manhattan is more horizontal than vertical. Instead of being laid out on one level, Bideawee has four floors to accommodate all its services and facilities. And every available space is used with economy and efficiency.

One of the cat rooms

One of the cat rooms

Puppies being socialized

Puppies being socialized

Hello! Wanna play?

Hello! Wanna play?

One of the veterinary clinic's exam rooms.

One of the veterinary clinic’s exam rooms.

Surgery room within the veterinary clinic

Surgery room within the veterinary clinic

The Intensive Care Unit

The Intensive Care Unit

Penny, one of the office cats.

Penny, one of the office cats.

Another office cat.

Another office cat.

One Sweet face looking for a home

One Sweet face looking for a home

This kitten is climbing the walls looking for his family.

This kitten is climbing the walls looking for his family.

Come play with me!

Come play with me!

A sweet face and a gentle purr.

A sweet face and a gentle purr.

Waiting patiently for a new family.

Waiting patiently for a new family.

 

A Short History of Bideawee

Courtesy of Bideawee.

Courtesy of Bideawee.

When Fiora D’Auby Kibbe founded Bideawee in 1903, she had a revolutionary idea: shelter unwanted pets until they could be placed in good homes instead of destroying them. Mrs. Kibbe was inspired to do this work after visiting Paris (France) where she had seen the Barrone d”Herpents Dog Refuge at Gennevilliers. This small French humane group sent its dog ambulance all over Paris to pick up unwanted and stray dogs. What was unique was that instead of destroying the dogs—as was the custom of the time—the group kept the dogs until new homes could be found.

Mrs. Kibbe’s humane efforts were not limited to unwanted pets. At the turn of the century, horses were the main mode of transportation. Through the efforts of Bideawee, fresh-water troughs were placed and maintained throughout the city—some of them still exist to this day.

Initially, Bideawee (“stay a while”) was located in a small building on Lexington Avenue, near Mrs. Kibbe’s home. But by 1909 there were nearly 200 dogs crammed into the makeshift space—in a very elegant residential area. The neighbors were very unhappy with the incessant barking, and Mrs. Kibbe was forced to move her shelter to Harrington, New Jersey. In 1912, after several moves, Bideawee found its own home (formerly a garage) on 38th Street, near the East River. This was a premium location for their work because at that time people brought unwanted pets to the river to drown them.

By 1915, Bideawee was overflowing and needed more space. A property in Wantagh, Long Island was purchased. And by 1916, the spacious grounds around the Wantagh Country Home also included a beautiful Pet Memorial Park.

As the years passed, Bideawee changed with the times. The area around Wantagh evolved from rural to densely populated and once again Bideawee needed more space. In 1956 the first kennel was built on 200 acres on Old Country Road in Westhampton. This was quickly followed by a second kennel and then a cattery. By 1966 a new adoption center was opened and a second Pet Memorial Park was established in Westhamption.

Today, Bideawee is one of the oldest and largest humane organizations in the United States. And Mrs. Kibbe is regarded as a pioneer in the “no-kill” movement.

Programs and Services

  • Two Adoption Centers: Manhattan and Westhampton, NY; all pets receive a complete medical exam, socialization or basic training, spay/neuter, micro-chip.
  • Second Start Program: Bideawee staff visit overwhelmed municipal shelters on a regular basis to rescue pets about to be euthanized due to lack of space/resources giving them a second chance at a new home. .
  • Veterinary Medical Services: a fully equipped medical center in both adoption center locations provides affordable, high quality care for the pets living in the centers as well as pets living in the vicinity.
  • Veterinary Medical Assistance Fund: gives assistance to private pet clients to offset the high costs associated with emergency treatment, catastrophic illness, or other special medical care when they might not otherwise be able to afford vet care for their pets.
  • Three Learning Centers: Located in Manhattan, Westhampton, and Wantagh offer educational programs that promote healthy, positive relationships between people and pets of all ages.
  • Reading to Dogs: Reading to a non-judgmental, non-critical, and loving four-footed friend helps children with reading challenges become better readers
  • Doga: Yoga for dogs brings dog and owner together for a relaxing session of massage and stretch. Regular sessions are held at both Learning Centers
  • Pet Therapy: Bideawee trained pet therapy pairs bring the healing effect of pets to schools, youth centers, homeless shelters, nursing homes and hospitals in the NYC and Long Island regions.
  • Pet Behavioral Training: at all three sites; group and private classes as well as “Ask the Trainer” sessions at community events help pet owners better understand and communicate with their pets.
  • Humane Education: Trained volunteers help teach responsible pet ownership, pet safety, training, animal health, licensing, and ethical animal treatment.
  • Pet Memorial Parks: at Westhampton and Wantagh; two of the oldest (1916) and largest (over 65,000 pets) parks offer a final resting place for cherished animal companions and include the support and guidance of compassionate Bideawee staff and counselors.
  • Bereavement Counseling: Pet loss support groups meet on a regular basis to help pet owners deal with their loss.
  • Dog Park: located in Westhampton, is “Love Unleashed.”
  • Locations & Hours of Operations

2009 Stats

  • 1,176 Adoptions
  • 645 Second Start Rescues
  • 275 Volunteers
  • 113 Pet Therapy Pairs
  • 28 Reading to Dogs Program Locations
  • 13,791 Veterinary, Shelter and Private Pet Patients
  • 1,093 Pet Memorial Park Interments and Cremations

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