Category Archives: Tyler

Swift-Silent-Fluffy

5-29-13-TylerStealth Doggie! In an effort to try and break Tyler of the habit of chewing on his tags, I’ve (finally!) moved all of his ID information to a tiny slip of paper held within the new little gold cylinder now hanging from his collar. The lack of jangling tags has rendered him swift and silent–like a canine black ops Marine. No way to predict when he might attack and lick you to death!

EzyDog? Definitely Easy!

DISCLOSURE: EzyDog sent me their harnesses to try–free of charge. And I get to keep them. This review represents my honest and personal experience and opinion. This review in no way represents the opinions or views of my employer, P&G Pet Care.

~*~

Tyler models the EzyDog Quick Fit Harness

Tyler models the EzyDog Quick Fit Harness

I don’t do many product reviews. But I was thrilled when my friend Pam (from Pet Blogs United and The Daily Oskar) asked me to take a look at a couple of EzyDog harnesses, because I had already heard about their standards of quality!

COMPANY BACKGROUND

Tyler models the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

Tyler models the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

EzyDog started production in a garage in Australia. Luke Hatcher, who worked in the water sports industry, enjoyed sharing his passion for “surf, sand, and adventure” with his Border Collie, Roger. Not satisfied with the available leashes, he used his knowledge of materials and manufacturing to create the “Original Shock Absorbing Dog Leash.” This unique leash features a bungie-cord-type shock absorber within the leash. Very quickly, demand for this leash was overwhelming and Mr. Hatcher turned his garage experiment into a successful business. EzyDog products continue to be handmade and are now sold in 18 countries worldwide.

THE CHEST PLATE HARNESS

Tyler models the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

Tyler models the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

We tried the Chest Plate Harness first. This is a basic harness in a criss-cross configuration with a pad that snugs up against the chest. Very simple to put on and adjust–a release buckle on each strap with length adjustment that starts at the buckle. There is a stainless-steal D-ring at the center back for attaching a leash. And the cute EzyDog logo (a doggy face) located at the D-ring helped me to know that I had the harness on correctly.

Note the EzyDog logo--a stylized dog face--in the center of the crossed straps

Note the EzyDog logo–a stylized dog face–in the center of the crossed straps

Once the straps were adjusted for Tyler, this harness was a breeze to put on and take off. It fit snug to his body without being constricting. I LOVED the reflective stitching running down either side of the straps. And he looked quite charming in basic black (this harness comes in several colors including camo and pink camo!)

Tyler, secured in the car with his EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

Tyler, secured in the car with his EzyDog Chest Plate Harness

This harness can be paired up with the EzyDog Seat Belt Restraint. This is a heavy looped strap which the seat belt passes through with a clip that snaps onto the harness’s D-ring.

Though I can see the quality, the Seat Belt Restraint was not successful for Tyler.¬† The strap of the Seat Belt Restraint was too short for Tyler. I think this would have worked very well for a bigger dog who would have the body weight to support moving the loop of the Seat Belt Restraint around when attached to the seat belt. I think we would have done better with the EzyDog Adjustable Car Restraint, which is similar to the very short leash I use as Tyler’s seat belt.

The short leash (an old leashed that I’ve shortened to approximately 2-feet with a loop for the car’s seat belt on one end and a clip for the harness on the other) worked very well with the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness and this harness has now become our first choice when Tyler goes for a ride in the car.

THE QUICK FIT HARNESS

The Quick Fit Harness is very well named–it’s quick to fit and really fast to put on. There are two points of adjustment. The torso strap adjusts at the buckle in the same way as the straps adjust on most harnesses. The neck strap is a very clever combination of Velcro under a sleeve padding. It’s hard to describe, so here is a video that explains it:

Strutting on down the street in the classy EzyDog Quick Fit Harness

Strutting on down the street in the classy EzyDog Quick Fit Harness

The Quick Fit Harness is AMAZING! Incredibly easy to put on–over the head, snap the strap and you’re done! It comes in a variety of colors–including Tyler’s favorite elegant black. And (like the Chest Plate Harness) it has reflective stitching that adds to its classy look. In very little time, I had the harness adjusted to Tyler and we were walking down the street. We LOVE this harness for walking!

THE BOTTOM LINE

  • Both of these harnesses are very well made.
  • The price for each harness is comparable to other harness brands; however, I am very impressed with the quality of the EzyDog harnesses. They are so nicely made!
  • After being adjusted, both harnesses fit Tyler perfectly and I felt no anxiety that he might accidentally slip out of either one.
  • This is the first time I can remember putting a harness on Tyler without him scratching at it with annoyance.
  • We love both of these harnesses, and when we wear them out we’ll be buying replacements from EzyDog!
Woof!

Woof!

EzyDog. Now go and play!

~

Two Year Anniversary

Two years ago today, I met Tyler Small Paws in Phoenix Arizona.

My sweet Bailey had crossed over the Rainbow Bridge on January 15, 2010. Bailey was my heart dog. She was 13 years old when she crossed after having finally lost the battle with cancer.

I wasn’t sure I was ready for a new dog in my life when Small Paws Rescue contacted me.

I don't feel so good.

I don’t feel so good.

I first saw Tyler in a Small Paws Rescue newsletter. It was this photo, from his shelter intake record. I could tell that he was not well–can you see it? Tyler had been found on a street in Phoenix with another puppy. Both puppies were starving and both puppies had parvo virus.

They were on death row within hours of being turned in to the shelter, because that was the shelter’s policy with parvo dogs. But the shelter knew about Small Paws, and someone telephoned the Small Paws Team Leader for Arizona–who turned out to be Tyler’s Guardian Angel. He got both puppies to a veterinary clinic, and Small Paws paid for their hospitalization.

Tyler’s photo haunted me.

On the way to his new home, a potty break in a family bathroom at the Airport in Atlanta

On the way to his new home, a potty break in a family bathroom at the Airport in Atlanta

At the end of May, 2010, I was still working through my grief for Bailey. But with thoughts of moving forward I had put myself on the Small Paws puppy list. At Small Paws, puppies are reserved first for people who are grieving. About a month after Tyler was rescued, I got an email asking me, did I want to adopt a puppy?

When I realized that it was the little parvo pup that had already been living rent-free in my head, it was a no-brainer! Plus, I was already on my way west on a business trip. With a little extra money, I was able to re-route my flight home to stop for a night in Phoenix and pick Tyler up from his foster mom (God bless you, Mikele, for all you do for the Fluffs!). This was meant to be.

Tyler, asleep on my hotel bed in Phoenix

Tyler, asleep on my hotel bed in Phoenix

Tyler was a skinny scrap of a pup. He was very underweight and his hair was cut very short to make it easier for the dogtors to deal with his illness. But I didn’t mind how he looked. From the first moment, he was so sweet and loving and I marveled that a creature who had received such a terrible start in life–abandoned, starved, sick–could still have the capacity to love. I get teary-eyed when I think of how he cuddled up to me that very first day, and trusted me to take care of him. I won’t betray that trust.

I think Bailey sent him to me.

Here’s how Tyler looks today….

Mr. Tyler, trying to tempt me to play instead of work.

Mr. Tyler, trying to tempt me to play instead of work.

 

 

My little snugglebug!

My little snugglebug!

 

With one of his favorite toys.

With one of his favorite toys.

 

Goofy boy!

Goofy boy!

He only weighs 8-pounds, but he’s the living heart of our home. I love you Tyler.

~ * ~

How Many Tags are Too Much?

2-18-12 1Tyler weighs 8 pounds. Currently on his “necklace” he has

  • His license to be a dog.
  • His rabies tag.
  • A tag from Small Paws Rescue with an 800 number to call if someone finds him wondering around unaccompanied by an adult human.
  • A tag with my name, address and phone numbers (home and cell) in case someone finds him wondering around unaccompanied by an adult human.
  • A tag indicating that he’s microchipped–which is blue plastic and something of a pacifier for him because he likes to grab it between his teeth and chew.

I think all the tags on his collar weigh nearly as much as he does. And I’m not certain if he really needs to wear all these tags.2-18-12 2

I love that Small Paws has an 800 number and a reward offer on their tag, but is it possible that someone might be confused as to whether to call my number (the tag with my name also says “reward”) or the Small Paws number?

Does the blue plastic microchip tag really add value? There isn’t a chip number on it, and he’s chewed it so much you can barely read the name of the chip company. I ordered a tag from the company–it’s a beautiful silver chrome, but it weighs nearly as much as the rest of his tags! I ended up putting it on my own key chain.

And the rabies tag—is it really important that he wear that on his collar? I’m not sure it is. For that matter, does he really need to wear the dog license? If he gets lost, won’t the tag with my name and the tag with Small Paws’ name on it be enough to get him home?2-18-12 3

I know that the tags bother him sometimes, because he scratches. In fact, he scratches so much that I’m probably going to have to replace the pretty collar I got for him at the dog show in December–it’s starting to look worn.

2-18-12 4So here’s what I’m going to try: I purchased a little ID tube. I’m going to put his license number, his rabies number (and our vet’s number), his microchip number, and the Small Paws phone number on a piece of paper and put it into the tube. Then I’ll put the tube and the tag that has my information on it on his collar and the rest of the tags in a drawer.

Do you have any better suggestions? What do you do about tags?

 

A Travel Tip: Flying with your Pet

Taking over the family restroom

Taking over the family restroom

I was going through some old photos tonight and came across photos I took of Tyler during our first full day together. We had a very early start that day, flying from Phoenix to Dayton with a layover in Atlanta.

Anything good in that bag?

Anything good in that bag?

I was lucky that Tyler was so small–he was able to fly in a pet carrier underneath the seat in front of me. I was able to walk him before we got on the plane in Phoenix. When we got to Atlanta, we had a little over an hour until we would board our next plane. And because we were in the gate area, I was not permitted to take Tyler out of his carrier.

Chowing down on some kibble! (He's so skinny!)

Chowing down on some kibble! (He’s so skinny!)

Here’s the tip: We found a “family restroom” and locked ourselves in for about 45 minutes! If you don’t know, a “family restroom” is a single potty, unisex bathroom containing a diaper changing table where a mom or dad traveling with children can more easily “take care of business” than in the regular stalls in the larger restrooms.

In Atlanta, there was a family restroom in between each men’s/women’s room.

Playtime!

Playtime!

Behind the locked door of the family restroom, I was able to let Tyler out of his bag so he could stretch his legs, eat some lunch, and pee on the pee pads I brought with us. We had a lovely time playing with his toy and having a few cuddles. When we were done, the pee pad went into the trash, and Tyler went back in his bag.

The family restroom was an absolute lifesaver!

Memories! Tyler’s First Blitz.

I was doing some clean-up on my YouTube account today, and came across a video I did of Tyler in June of 2010. This is his very first Bichon Blitz in his new home. He looks so skinny! But that’s because this is just weeks after his rescue by the mighty warriors of Small Paws Rescue–he was only a very few weeks away from recuperating from starvation and parvo virus.¬† Watch my sweet boy run!